Concert

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL 2015

We welcome you to the 4th Chamber Music Festival of Minoa Palace Resort & Spa. Faithfull to our autumn meeting, we tried this year to travel with you in a musical journey to the unlimited world of classical music. This time, with the conduct of 2 concerts, 8 important artists coexist in different musical combinations, presenting a series of unique works. Each one of these, has contributed in its own way to the evolution of formal music; novel musical “languages” in harmony, in rythm, in the adoption of local idoms, even in the combination of instruments, are presented in boldness and exquisite mastery from their pioneer creators. We urge you to identify them and enjoy them.

Corelli La Folia

Simos Papanas - Violin
Angelos Liakakis - Cello
Dubee Sohn - Harpsichord

Vivaldi Trio Sonata "La folia"

10'

Dimitris Karakantas - Violin
Simos Papanas - Violin
Angelos Liakakis - Cello
Dubee Sohn - Harpsichord

Liszt Rhapsodie Espagnole

13'

Vassilis Varvaresos - Piano

Rachmaninoff Variations on "La Folia"

18'

Vassilis Varvaresos - Piano

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Papanas String Quartet

Noe Inui - Violin
Dimitris Karakantas - Violin
George Demertzis - Viola
Angelos Liakakis - Cello

Festival Concerts

Ticket: 10€ for each Concert
Tickets are sold at the Minoa Palace Resort

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Concert
Works

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL 2015

Minoa Chamber Music Festival - Archangello Corelli - Violin Sonata La Folia (Theme with 23 Variations)

Archangello Corelli

Violin Sonata La Folia (Theme with 23 Variations)

D MINOR, OP.5 NO,12

Arcangelo Corelli (1653–1713) was one of the most sought-after violin teachers in Italy and his pupils included Castrucci, Gasparini, Geminiani, Bonporti and Locatelli. His set of twelve Violin Sonatas, Op 5, published in 1700 and dedicated to the Electress Sophia of Brandenburg, was a landmark in the history of violin playing. Over forty further editions of it appeared during the eighteenth century. Francesco Geminiani even produced a successful arrangement of the Sonatas as concerti grossi. All other baroque sonatas can be defined as being pre- or post-Corelli', says Andrew Manze , the distinguished baroque violinist. The most famous Sonata of the set is the last one, No 12, La Folia. Cast as a single movement in the form of a chaconne, it is almost too well known to invite comment, but mention should be made of Corelli’s unprecedented instinct for the overall balance of the variations; he always judges exactly when to succeed fast with slow, hectic with calm. Although the famous ‘La Folia’ tune had appeared in dozens of arrangements during the seventeeth century, this was its first taste of the exalted world of the sonata.

MOVEMENTS

I. Adagio
II. Allegro
III. Adagio
IV. Vivace
V. Allegro
VI. Andante
VII. Allegro
VIII. Adagio
IX. Allegro

Minoa Chamber Music Festival - Antonio Vivaldi - Trio Sonata

Antonio Vivaldi

Trio Sonata "La folia" (Theme with 20 Variations)

D MINOR, RV63

Vivaldi’s "Variations on La Follia" is part of a set of 12 trio sonatas, Op. 1, No. 12 (the earliest known edition is dated 1705) and it’s scored for two violins and a basso continuo part. The collection of Twelve Trio Sonatas Op. 1 was published by the Venetian house of Giuseppe Sala in 1705. Similarly to the other published collec- tions by Vivaldi, it became known throughout Europe and reprinted four more times within the composer’s lifetime. It was dedicated to Count Annibale Gambara. At the turn of the 17th and 18th centuries, the trio sonata was one of the most popular genres of instrumental music in Italy. The composers modelled their work on four sonata collections by Arcangelo Corelli, but Vivaldi was no dutiful copycat who merely recycled ideas from his eminent older colleague. Vivaldi’s variations are showier, spikier, and more extroverted than Corelli’s, but they are just as meticulously constructed and paced. The cleanly harmonized statement of the stately, La Folia theme, is followed by 19 variations in various tempos, virtuoso in character and exceptionally differentiated; some carry connotations with various stylised dances. They present in a nutshell the entirety of Vivaldi’s knowledge of instrumental technique.

MOVEMENTS

I. Adagio
II. Andante
III. Allegro
IV. Adagio
V. Vivace
VI. Allegro
VII. Largetto
VIII. Allegro
IX. Adagio
X. Allegro

Minoa Chamber Music Festival - Franz LIszt - Rhapsodie Espagnole

Franz LIszt

Rhapsodie Espagnole

S.254 R.90

The 1860s were a time of great sadness for Franz Liszt. Dealing with the death of his son, Daniel, in 1859 and his daughter, Blandine, later in 1862, as well as the Catholic Church’s refusal to grant his mistress a divorce from her husband, Liszt receded into a solitary life. In 1863, he took up residence at a monastery outside of Rome called Madonna del Rosario. Liszt participated only occasional in Rome’s musical life and much of his compositional efforts eventually turned toward sacred works. However, one of the first compositions to come from his pen in this new austere life was the Rhapsodie espagnole for solo piano. Liszt’s “Spanish Rhapsody”, composed in 1863, is heavily influenced by traditional

MOVEMENTS

I. Lento
II. Andante Moderato (Folies D'Espagne)
III. Allegro Animato
IV. Allegro (Jota Aragonese)
V. Un poco Meno Allegro
VI. Molto Vivace
VII. Sempre Presto

Minoa Chamber Music Festival - Sergei Rachmaninoff - Variations on a theme by Corelli

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Variations on a theme by Corelli "La Folia"

D MINOR, OP.42

In May and June 1931 Sergei Rachmaninoff composed his famous and much-played piano ‘Variations on a Theme by Corelli’, Op. 42. The impetus for writing his op.42 almost certainly derived from Rachmaninoff hearing Arcangelo Corelli's Violin Sonata in D minor op.5 no. 12 performed by his colleague, chamber music partner and legendary violinist, Fritz Kreisler. Rachmaninoff attributed the theme's origin to the Italian composer, and dedicated his variations to its messenger, Kreisler, but he was indisputably familiar with at least one other version of the same theme: his concert repertoire had long included Liszt's Rhapsodic espagnol, which features 'La folia' as one of its main subjects.The Theme is followed by 20 variations, an Intermezzo between variations 13 and 14, and a Coda to finish. Quite imaginatively, these twenty variations are organized in a manner that almost resembles a full-scale sonata. Rachmaninov wrings out a masterly exploration of the possibilities of this simplest of original material. The work is conceived as one, with an Intermezzo, which is in fact a cadenza, before the fourteenth variation. The final rapid set of variations lead to a gentle coda. The variations represent a new phase in Rachmaninov's compositions, where a tendency for greater clarity of texture is coupled with considerable harmonic originality and daring.

MOVEMENTS

Theme Andante
I. Poco Miu Mosso
II. L'Istesso Tempo
III. Tempo di Menuetto
IV. Andante
V. Allegro (Ma non tanto )
VI. L'Istesso Tempo
VII. Vivace
VIII. Adagio Misterioso
IX. Un Poco Miu Posso
X. Allegro Scherzando
XI. Allegro Vivace
XII. L'Istesso Tempo
XIII. Agitato Intermezzo
XIV. Andante
XV. L'Istesso Tempo
XVI. Allegro Vivace
XVII. Meno Mosso
XVIII. Allegro Con Brio
XIX. Piu Mosso Agitato
XX. Piu Moso Coda Andante

Minoa Chamber Music Festival - Simos Papanas - String Quartet No.2

Simos Papanas

String Quartet No.2 "La Folia"

No.2

Vivaldi’s "Variations on La Follia" is part of a set of 12 trio sonatas, Op. 1, No. 12 (the earliest known edition is dated 1705) and it’s scored for two violins and a basso continuo part. The collection of Twelve Trio Sonatas Op. 1 was published by the Venetian house of Giuseppe Sala in 1705. Similarly to the other published collections by Vivaldi, it became known throughout Europe and reprinted four more times within the composer’s lifetime. It was dedicated to Count Annibale Gambara. At the turn of the 17th and 18th centuries, the trio sonata was one of the most popular genres of instrumental music in Italy. The composers modelled their work on four sonata collections by Arcangelo Corelli, but Vivaldi was no dutiful copycat who merely recycled ideas from his eminent older colleague. Vivaldi’s variations are showier, spikier, and more extroverted than Corelli’s, but they are just as meticulously constructed and paced. The cleanly harmonized statement of the stately, La Folia theme, is followed by 19 variations in various tempos, virtuoso in character and exceptionally differentiated; some carry connotations with various stylised dances. They present in a nutshell the entirety of Vivaldi’s knowledge of instrumental technique.

MOVEMENTS

I. Introduction Lento
II. Thema with 7 Variations
III. Grave
IV. Allegro Molto
V. Adagio
VI. Vivace
VII. Finale

Meet the Concert's
Musicians